Five of Rickey Henderson’s finest on-field moments

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Mar 15, 2016; Salt River Pima-Maricopa, AZ, USA; Oakland Athletics special instructor Rickey Henderson talks with fans prior to the game against the Colorado Rockies at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick. Mandatory Credit: Matt Kartozian-USA TODAY Sports
Mar 15, 2016; Salt River Pima-Maricopa, AZ, USA; Oakland Athletics special instructor Rickey Henderson talks with fans prior to the game against the Colorado Rockies at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick. Mandatory Credit: Matt Kartozian-USA TODAY Sports /
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The All-Time Stolen Base Record

Rickey Henderson opened the 1991 season with 936 stolen bases. Yet his progress towards breaking Brock’s all-time record of 938 steals was slowed due to a calf strain he suffered in April.

Rickey would return to the Athletics, after his stint on the disabled list, on April 27. The very next day Henderson tied Brock’s record in a game against the then-California Angels.

It seemed Henderson’s path to being Major League Baseball’s all-time stolen base king would now be easy, but it wasn’t as simple as everyone assumed it would be.

He’d stolen his 939th base in just 12 seasons, a feat that took Brock 17 seasons to accomplish. He was on that day as he would later say in his speech, “the greatest of all-time.”

Three days later in a game against the New York Yankees, on May 1, 1991, Henderson leadoff the game with a walk but was called out trying to steal second base on a throw by Yankees’ catcher  Matt Nokes.

In his second time at the plate Rickey Henderson struck out to end the second inning.

During his third at-bat in the fourth inning of the ballgame, Henderson reached first base on an error and was advanced to second on a single by fellow outfielder Dave Henderson.

This time Rickey took off for third base and Nokes bounced his throw to third baseman Randy Velarde.

Henderson was called safe.

He’d stolen his 939th base in just 12 seasons, a feat that took Brock 17 seasons to accomplish. He was on that day as he would later say in his speech, “the greatest of all-time.”

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