Ray Fosse leaves broadcast booth to battle cancer

Mar 30, 2018; Oakland, CA, USA; Oakland Athletics retired player Ray Fosse during a presentation to recognize the 50th anniversary team at Oakland Coliseum. Mandatory Credit: Kelley L Cox-USA TODAY Sports
Mar 30, 2018; Oakland, CA, USA; Oakland Athletics retired player Ray Fosse during a presentation to recognize the 50th anniversary team at Oakland Coliseum. Mandatory Credit: Kelley L Cox-USA TODAY Sports /
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Ray Fosse has been a part of the Oakland A’s organization for decades. A part of their championship teams in 1973 and 1974, he returned to the organization in 1986 as a part of their broadcasting team. Since that time, Fosse has been a part of the family, spending those pleasant spring and summer evenings with us while calling the games.

But Fosse had been keeping a secret from everyone. He had been battling cancer for the past 16 years, and is now taking time away from broadcasting to focus on this treatment.

Oakland A’s broadcaster Ray Fosse shows remarkable toughness

Fosse’s toughness was already well known from his playing days. He was involved in one of the more infamous plays in All Star Game history, getting run over by Pete Rose during the 1970 Mid-Summer Classic. While he seemingly did not suffer an injury after that play, it was discovered later that he had suffered a fractured and separated shoulder that had healed incorrectly.

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Although he was no longer an All Star caliber catcher by the time he came to the A’s due to his injuries, he was still a solid player. Injuries did hinder him during his time in Oakland as well, but he posted a .222/.262/.320 batting line with 11 homers and 34 doubles in his 901 plate appearances, saving seven runs defensively.

He also made his mark in the postseason. Fosse threw out five would-be base stealers in the 1973 American League Championship Series against the Orioles, more than making up for his lack of offense. He won two rings as a member of the A’s before being sent back to the Indians for cash considerations after the 1975 season, eventually retiring after injuries suffered during spring training in 1980.

Hopefully, Fosse will be fine after his latest round of treatment. He was a battler throughout his career, a player whose toughness was never questioned. He will face these treatments the same way, showing that toughness as he looks to win his long battle and return to the booth in 2022.

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Our thoughts are with Oakland A’s broadcaster and former catcher Ray Fosse, who has stepped aside to focus on his 16 year battle with cancer.

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